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RE: Splinterlands Ethereum Integration is Live!

in #splinterlands10 months ago

Nice. I purchased a 500 (+50 charges) "brilliant legendary" plus 500 (+50 charges) "brilliant alchemy" potion combination last week, and it was a nice feeling to be able to use fiat (instead of tapping into crypto) to do the purchase. Didn't realize you can't do that with cards, but now that you have announced this that sounds like a certain step forward.

I am a bit weary of using ETH (Metamask) and having to pay gas fees, so I am just curious to know how this Ethereum integration will benefit the game sheerly in terms of increasing exposure of the game. Can anyone give me a quick, one-to-two sentence explanation of how having the cards on the Ethereum blockchain will expand the reach of the whole game overall? Just curious...

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Imagine being a typical Ethereum user and find yourself with splinterland cards in OpenSea, discover the game and realize that you don't need to use metamask (but you can buy the cards in open.sea, initially here I would buy the cards), once you understand how steem works and that the game doesn't require so much gas, it doesn't even exist, it will stay here, that's what I think could happen, the users that prefer Ethereum are too many, and discovering steem could be possible by putting those cards in that great market.

Great. Thanks for explaining that in simple terms. Yes, I would think that this would boost Steem/Splinterlands exposure by making more people on other major blockchains (ex. Ethereum) aware of the cards, the game, and the unique benefits of the Steem blockchain itself. In fact, I recently got an airdrop of cards from another card game (using OpenSea) and saw that I had to pay the "gas money", which was actually like ~ $0.50 USD. I should even have to pay ANYTHING for a GIFT pack of cards. So that showed me very clearly the downside of the gas fee, and the upside of the zero fee for Steem.

The problem with gas is that it increases as a function of the transactions of the entire network, there are moments that it collapses, and it is not fun, the fee becomes exaggeratedly expensive, you simply wait for the blowout to pass and sometimes it lasts 1 week or more, it is the longest I have seen, sometimes just 2 days.